Friday, December 9, 2011

hThings You Need To Know When Buying A House - 9

9. Do your homework before bidding.

Your opening bid should be based on the sales trend of similar homes in the neighborhood. So before making it, consider sales of similar homes in the last three months. If homes have recently sold at 5 percent less than the asking price, you should make a bid that's about eight to 10 percent lower than what the seller is asking.  This is not an ironclad rule.  Seek the advice of an experienced, reputable, Realtor that can give you the information you need to make a well informed decision.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Things You Need To Know When Buying A House - 8

8. Before house hunting, get pre-approved.

Getting pre-approved will you save yourself the grief of looking at houses you can't afford and put you in a better position to make a serious offer when you do find the right house. Not to be confused with pre-qualification, which is based on a cursory review of your finances, pre-approval from a lender is based on your actual income, debt and credit history.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Things You Need To Know When Buying A House - 7

7. Choose carefully between points and rate.

When picking a mortgage, you usually have the option of paying additional points -- a portion of the interest that you pay at closing -- in exchange for a lower interest rate. If you stay in the house for a long time -- say three to five years or more -- it's usually a better deal to take the points. The lower interest rate will save you more in the long run.  Right now interests rates are at an unprecidented low.  If you are in the position to buy now, you will be able to save yourself tens of thousands of dollars over the life of the loan by qualifying for a low interest rate.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Things You Need To Know When Buying A House - 6

6. Get professional help.

Even though the Internet gives buyers unprecedented access to home listings, most new buyers (and many more experienced ones) are better off using a professional agent. Look for a real estate agent who is very familiar with the area you are interested in and who will have your interests at heart and can help you with strategies during the bidding process.

 

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Monday, December 5, 2011

Things You Need To Know When Buying A House - 5

5. Buy in a district with good schools.

In most areas, this advice applies even if you don't have school-age children. Reason: When it comes time to sell, you'll learn that strong school districts are a top priority for many home buyers, thus helping to boost property values.

 

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Friday, November 4, 2011

Things You Need To Know When Buying A House - 4

4. If you can't put down the usual 20 percent, you may still qualify for a loan.

There are a variety of public and private lenders who, if you qualify, offer low-interest mortgages that require a down payment as small as 3 percent of the purchase price.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Thursday, November 3, 2011

Things You Need To Know When Buying A House - 3

3. Aim for a home you can really afford.

The rule of thumb is that you can buy housing that runs about two-and-one-half times your annual salary. But you'll do better to use one of many calculators available online to get a better handle on how your income, debts, and expenses affect what you can afford.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Things You Need To Know When Buying A House - 2

2. Start by shoring up your credit.

Since you most likely will need to get a mortgage to buy a house, you must make sure your credit history is as clean as possible. A few months before you start house hunting, get copies of your credit report. Make sure the facts are correct, and fix any problems you discover.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Things You Need To Know When Buying A House - 1

1. Don't buy if you can't stay put.

If you can't commit to remaining in one place for at least a few years, then owning is probably not for you, at least not yet. With the transaction costs of buying and selling a home, you may end up losing money if you sell any sooner - even in a rising market. When prices are falling, it's an even worse proposition.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Friday, October 28, 2011

Keep Pets Save With Microchipping

Remember Willow, the calico kitty who went missing from her Colorado home, then was miraculously found five years later in New York City? She has to be one of the luckiest felines in the world. Due to the Squires family’s very astute decision to have her micro-chipped, they have been reunited and one very happy kitty has been returned home.

Many pet owners fear pets going missing. This can easily happen when you move across town or across the country. According to Home Again, the nationwide petID and recovery service, one in three pets will become lost during their lifetime, and sadly, 90 percent of them will never return home without identification. Home Again is the micrchip company that powers our two Great Danes, Marley and June Bug microchips.

Even though responsible animal owners collar their pets with identification information, collars can fall off, becoming discarded by the animal, or, much worse, be removed if the animal is stolen. External devices fall short in providing permanent identification information. What is even more alarming; there has been a 32 percent increase in the theft of pets from 2010 to 2011, according to The American Kennel Club. Micro-chipping is the only permanent, reliable method, since it cannot be altered or removed and has a unique code that links the animal back to its owner.

Every day pets become lost and will never see their family again because they didn’t have a simple, yet effective tool to reunite them with their family. However, inserting a microchip is the simplest and most important step a pet owner can take to ensure that a lost pet returns home safely. I believe every pet should be micro-chipped, and right now, not enough pets are protected—it should be as common as a collar or ID tag.

How does micro-chipping work? Since the microchips are no larger than a grain of rice, they are implanted by a veterinarian using a hypodermic needle. This simple procedure is similar to giving the animal a vaccination. Since the discomfort pets may experience is about the same as a "shot," veterinarians rarely use local anesthesia.

The micro-chipping procedure is quick and safe and can be done at a local vetinarian hospital. This inexpensive and permanent device is the best hope a pet owner has of protecting a lost or stolen pet. I think it cost Lori and I somewhere between $35 and $50 to have each of our dogs microchipped. Check with your vetinarian for their cost, it is money well spent as far as I am concerned.

Included in the Home Again microchip is lifetime registration, permitting the pet owner to update their contact information, if necessary, at no additional charge. Provided is a tag with instructions if the lost pet is found. Make sure your pet undergoes a routine microchip scan during every hospital visit to verify the emission by its actual owner.

What are your thoughts about micro-chipping? Share them in a comment.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

 

Thursday, October 27, 2011

How to Make Moving With Pets Easier - Part 4

Settling In

While you and your family may be excited about your new habitat, your pet may feel confused or disoriented and will take some time to adjust to their new surroundings. Be patient and offer lots of love and affection to soothe their nerves.

You might want to purchase pheromone diffusers -- often helpful in calming both dogs and cats. The diffusers are available at most pet supply stores.

Cats: For the first few days, your cats will benefit from being confined to a single room while you organize the rest of your home. Unpack their bedding, toys, food and water dish and litter box and consider a window perch for them to enjoy the new view. After a few days, introduce cats to one new room at a time, always reminding them where the litter box is located.

Dogs: Ideally, introduce dogs to a new home when furniture is in place. Let them become familiar with one room before introducing to another. This can take a few days, but will ease your dogs' nerves and prevent a frightened escape. And when taking your pet outdoors, keep him or her on a leash.

Choose a new veterinarian for your pet as soon as possible! Talk to neighbors or contact the local veterinary association for help. Also, find the nearest emergency veterinary hospital and take a practice drive to find it so you don't waste precious time in a crisis.

With your love and assurance, your pet will soon adjust to your new abode. After all, for pets, home is where you are!

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

How to Make Moving With Pets Easier - Part 2

As i mentioned yesterday, our Danes had a hard time adjusting to our move. Here is a tip that you might want to try to help your furry friend adapt to their new environment a little easier. It actually begins before you move them. Something we did not do.

Before the move

Begin packing well in advance so your pet becomes accustomed to changes in their environment.

If your routine will alter after the move, gradually alter it before the move.

Therefore, change play times and walk times a bit. If your move will take you from an urban environment to a suburban or rural one (or vise versa) introduce your pet to new environs and assess their response.

If you have concerns about how your pet might react to these changes, consult with a veterinary behaviorist to develop a treatment plan for your pet.

As soon as you know your new address, purchase new identification tags for each pet. If your pet is microchipped, call the microchip manufacturer to update the database with your new contact information.

It never occured to us until reading this tip that we have not changed our dogs microchip information. Luckily it is connected with our vetinarian. This is on our to do list today.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

Monday, October 24, 2011

How To Make Moving With Your Pet Easier - Part 1

When Lori and I moved into our new home about three years ago, we did not realize how moving our entire environment would effect our two Great Danes, Marley and June Bug. It was very difficult for them, especially Marley (the princess). There were no familiar smells, everything was different. She was not herself for several months. If we had known we certainly would have taken much more care in their transition to their new home.

A new home is a stressful change for most pets. Learn how to make moving a smooth transition for your pets.Moving is clearly among the most stressful changes in life for us humans. Imagine what pets are thinking when 'home sweet home' is packed up and hauled off, only to reappear on strange new turf!

"The environmental changes, alterations in social structure and variation in routines can be very disconcerting for your pet," explains one vetinarian behavior expert. "All these changes can make a pet feel insecure and anxious".

So during this hectic time, be careful not to overlook the needs of your furry, finned and feathered friends. Planning is key in for a smooth transition.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

How to Make Moving With Pets Easy - Part 3

Moving Day & Travel

Be sure your dog or cat is wearing their collar with new ID tags on moving day. When the movers arrive, secure pets in a quiet room, away from the main traffic areas to prevent them from escaping. Be sure to alert each mover and family member that the room is off limits.

Time to hit the road? Whether transporting your pet by plane, train or automobile, talk to your vetinarian for advice on how your pet can make the trip most comfortably. For air travel, allow ample time to make arrangements and meet all air travel guidelines.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

Friday, October 21, 2011

Resourses To Help Consumers Shop For The Best Mortgage

The National Association of REALTORS® (NAR):

For information on NAR’s Housing Opportunity Program, go to www.REALTOR.org/HousingOpportunity.

 

The Center for Responsible Lending (CRL):

For information about predatory mortgage lending practices, including “The Seven Signs of Predatory Lending,” go to www.ResponsibleLending.org.

 

Other brochures to help consumers shop for the best

mortgage:

NAR and CRL have issued two other brochures:

“Specialty (Non-Traditional) Mortgages: What Are the Risks and Advantages?”

“Traditional Mortgages: Understanding Your Options”

NAR and the Federal Housing Administration of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development have issued a brochure on “FHA Insured Mortgages.” FHA mortgages provide a safe and affordable option for homebuyers.  You may view, download, and order these brochures. Go to: http://www.realtor.org/housopp.nsf/pages/mortgages?

 

Fannie Mae: “For Home Buyers & Homeowners”

at www.FannieMae.com.

 

Freddie Mac: “Buying and Owning a Home”

at www.FreddieMac.com.

 

Ginnie Mae:

For a simple calculator to help homebuyers estimate how much they can afford to spend, read “How Much Home

Can You Afford?” at www.GinnieMae.gov.

 

HUD Housing Counselors:

For a list of counseling agencies, by state, approved by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD),

go to www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/hccprof14.cfm.

 

Credit-reporting agencies:

Equifax 800.685.1111 www.equifax.com.

Experian 888.397.3742 www.experian.com.

TransUnion 800.916.8800 www.transunion.com.

Go to www.annualcreditreport.com to ask for a free copy of your credit report, once a year, or call 877.322.8228.

See also, www.FTC.gov.

 

“Looking for the Best Mortgage” is a brochure on how to shop, compare, and negotiate the best deal on a home loan.  The brochure is a joint effort of 11 federal agencies, including the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Federal Reserve Board, HUD, and the Department of Justice. www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/mortgage/mortb_1.htm.

 

Consumer Handbook on Adjustable Rate Mortgages

(the CHARM booklet) issued by the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) and the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS).

http://www.FederalReserve.gov. At the FRB site, click on “publications and education resources” and then on “consumer information brochures.”

 

 

 

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Other Solutions Realtors And Home Buyers Can Use To Avoid Predator Lenders

Check out lenders with the Better Business Bureau, government websites, or other consumer groups. How long has the lender been in business? Have consumers filed many complaints? Does the lender belong to a trade association with ethics requirements for its members?

 

Refuse to participate in transactions that may be fraudulent.

 

Share predatory lending “horror” stories with regulators, other consumers, REALTORS®, counseling groups,  housing professionals, and the media.

 

Make contracts subject to the homebuyer receiving approval from a lender for a fair and affordable loan.

 

Avoid unnecessary contract extensions that could cause the lender’s loan commitment to lapse.

 

Get educated on the value of your home by asking your REALTOR® for a comparative market analysis.

 

Review the HUD-1 closing statement before closing. Upon request, home buyers have the right to see this information 24 hours before the loan closing.

 

Report possible violations to appropriate federal, state and local officials.

 

 

 

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

If The Loan Is An Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) Ask:

What is the initial rate?

 

How long will that rate stay in effect?

 

How is the adjusted interest rate determined? (Generally, a specified amount—the “margin”—is added to a current published rate—the “index.”)

 

How often can the rate change?

 

How much can the rate go up each year and over the life of the loan? What is the maximum monthly payment you could be required to pay?   Would you be able to afford it?

 

Does the loan set a minimum interest rate?

 

Do the monthly payments gradually decrease the amount you owe even if interest rates increase? (With some loans, the amount you still owe can increase rather than decrease each month—called “negative amortization.”)

 

Does the interest rate increase if your payments are late?

 

Could you qualify for a loan with the maximum interest rate permitted under the mortgage? If not, do you anticipate earning more in the future so you will be able to afford the higher payment?

 

Can the adjustable rate mortgage loan be converted (changed) to a fixed rate without refinancing into a new loan? Is there a charge to convert?

 

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Monday, October 17, 2011

Shop For The Lowest-Cost Loan

REALTORS®   develop relationships of trust with the families they serve, and can help you avoid predatory loans by

encouraging careful shopping. Ask these important questions:

 

What is my credit score? Can I have a copy of my credit report?

 

What is the best interest rate today? Do I qualify?

 

Is the loan’s interest rate fixed or adjustable?

 

What is the term (length) of the loan?

 

What are the total loan fees?

 

What is the total monthly payment? Does this include property taxes and insurance? If not, how much will I need each month for taxes and insurance?

 

Is there an application fee? If so, what is it, and how much is refundable if I don’t qualify?

 

Are there any prepayment penalties? If so, what are they and how long do they last?

 

 

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Beware of Predatory Loans!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For most families, buying a home is the biggest and smartest purchase they ever make. One of the keys to success is getting an affordable home loan with fair terms and reasonable costs.  Unfortunately, home buyers need to be aware that some loans  are not in their best interest. When loans hurt instead of help, they can quickly lead to foreclosure and even bankruptcy.  

There is no single definition of predatory lending, because the term covers a wide range of abusive practices. Some practices may be predatory for one borrower but not for another, because everyone’s circumstances are different. Predatory lenders often take advantage of first-time homebuyers and others who may be vulnerable to high-pressure sales tactics.  

can provide information about predatory lending, refer clients to reputable lenders, and encourage families to make informed decisions about how to finance their homes.   Responsible lenders play a vital role in helping families achieve homeownership, but consumers need to make sure they are not dealing with a predatory lender. Some unscrupulous lenders are only interested in taking as much money as possible, and are not concerned about whether loans are affordable, sustainable, and truly helpful to home buyers and homeowners.

Remember the old saying, "if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!"

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Salvaged Building Material Savings - Working With Salvage

Working with salvage

To effectively integrate salvaged items, Arne Mortensen, owner of Mortensen Design/Build in Seattle, recommends choosing a contractor who has a particular interest and experience in working with recycled building materials. Salvage yard staffs may be able to recommend someone; other sources for ‘green’ contractors include online sites like Angie’s List.

Nonetheless, the time-consuming legwork of finding good pieces generally falls to the homeowner. To make the process easier, spend time thinking about and researching online what you want before you begin to shop. And be prepared to be persistent; happy hunting takes patience.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Salvaged Building Material Savings - The Value

The value of salvage building components

Salvaged elements may not add to a home’s appraised value.  An appraiser probably won’t include a home’s reclaimed heart pine beams in the kitchen or the bathroom’s antique plumbing fixtures when calculating the house’s value.

But that doesn’t mean the seller can’t use those amenities as selling points and boost the asking price accordingly.  Homebuyers may be willing to pay more for authentic elements that give a house personality.

Talking with a local realtor before making changes; they’ll have a good sense of the housing market’s current demands and should be able to tell you whether a vintage element will boost your home’s market value.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

Monday, October 10, 2011

Salvaged Building Material Savings - Sample Price Comparisons

Sample price comparisons for various salvaged materials

Salvaged oak flooring: $1 to $3 per sq. ft.
New oak flooring: $4 to $10 per sq. ft.
Average savings for 12x16-foot room: $960

Salvaged interior solid panel door (basic): $20 to $50
New interior panel door: $100 to $200
Average savings: $115

Secondhand pedestal sink: $20 to $250
New pedestal sink: $100 to $800
Average savings: $315

Recycled crown molding: $.30 to $1 per lineal ft.
New crown molding: $.90 to $3 per lineal ft.
Average savings for 12x16-foot room: $72.80

Don’t forget to add in transportation costs. Not all salvage yards deliver, and those that do aren’t necessarily cheap: the cost of getting materials across town could be $100 or more. It might make more sense to borrow or rent a truck on your own.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

Sunday, October 9, 2011

Possible Warning Signs Of A Predatory Loan

Sounds too easy. “Guaranteed approval” or “no income verification” regardless of borrower’s current  employment, credit history, and assets. These claims indicate the lender doesn’t care about whether you can afford to make the payments over the long haul.

 

Excessive fees. Higher lender and/or mortgage broker fees than are typical in your market. Because these costs can be financed as part of the loan, they are easy to disguise or downplay. On competitive loans, fees are negotiable. It is common for home buyers to pay only one percent of the loan amount for prime loans. By contrast, a typical predatory loan may cost five percent or more.

 

Large future costs. High-risk adjustable rate mortgages where the payment rises a lot after a short introductory period are seldom appropriate for families who already have had problems repaying other loans. Home buyers also should avoid a large single “balloon” payment (a lump sum due at the end of the loan’s term).

 

Closing delays. The lender deliberately delays closing so the commitment on a reasonably-priced loan expires.

 

Over-valued property. Inflated appraisals that allow excessive fees to be included in the loan and result in the borrower owing more to the bank than the home is worth.

 

Barriers to refinancing. Prepayment penalties that make it hard for a borrower to refinance in order to pay off a high-cost loan by taking advantage of a low-cost loan.

 

No down payment loans. These loans may be split into two mortgages, with one having a much higher cost. Home buyers should be sure they can afford the payments.

 

Unethical document management. An ethical lender or broker will always require you to sign key loan papers, and they will never ask you to sign a document dated before the date you sign it.

 

 

 

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry.  For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit:  http://www.BobAbner.com

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Salvaged Building Material Savings - Lead Paint

Dealing with lead paint

Some old items need to be treated with serious care such as items that appear to be lead paint hazards—that is, anything painted prior to 1978, when the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) banned lead in paints.

Nevertheless, buyers of old painted items need to be aware of the potential hazards. Older paint doesn’t mean the pieces are unusable, but the paint must be thoroughly removed or sealed—never scraped or sanded. The CPSC offers guidelines for treating lead paint in the household.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com

Monday, October 3, 2011

Saving Money with Salvaged Building Materials

If you’re looking to improve your home on the cheap, consider using salvaged building materials. Besides being less expensive than new materials, secondhand features can add character, quality, and value to your home. But note that the savings in dollars may require a greater investment in time and effort.

Remodeling with secondhand building materials has many fans. Some are owners of historic houses who improve their homes by adding period elements. Others follow green building practices and appreciate conserving resources and keeping materials out of landfills. And still others are looking for quirky elements that will break their homes out of cookie-cutter molds.

Bob Abner (Huff Realty) is a well-respected, top Realtor in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati real estate market with vast experience in the real estate industry. For Northern Kentucky Real Estate Listings and Home buying and selling Information visit: http://www.BobAbner.com